Accessible DVDs & Blu-Rays released in October

In Media Access Australia’s most recent search we have found that captioning and audio description across both DVD and Blu-Ray remains at their usual levels.

Of the 84 DVD titles searched, 54 per cent were captioned and 33 per cent were audio described. Of the same titles, 63 had a Blu-Ray version and accessibility rated at 67 per pent for captions and 44 per cent for audio description.

A few inconsistences were identified:

  • Distributors Madman, Pinnacle, Jigsaw, Paramount & Umbrella all had titles released internationally with either captions or subtitles that were not released in Region 4, which includes Australia
  • The Blu-Ray of Byzantium from Reel confusingly had “closed caption yes/no” on the cover but without “yes” or “no” being highlighted.
  • Chasing Mavericks from Hopscotch Entertainment had captions on the DVD but not the Blu-Ray edition.
  • Curse of Chucky from Universal Sony listed DVS (Descriptive Video Service, another name for audio description) on its Blu-Ray edition but not on DVD.
  • A Field in England from Madman included captions on Blu-Ray but not DVD.

Recently released DVD titles with audio description and captions

  • Adventures in Zambesia
  • The Big Wedding
  • The Bling Ring
  • The Call
  • Dead In Tombstone
  • Dead Man Down
  • Despicable Me 2
  • The Details
  • Emperor
  • Epic
  • Escape from Planet Earth
  • Fast and Furious 6
  • Gatsby
  • GI Joe Retaliation
  • Iceman, The
  • Identity Thief
  • Internship, The
  • Iron Man 3
  • Killing Season
  • Kontiki
  • Mud
  • Olympus Has Fallen
  • Penthouse North
  • The Place Beyond the Pines
  • The Purge
  • Song for Marion
  • Star Trek: Into Darkness
  • World War Z

These titles and more can be found in our audio described DVD database.

Find out how to identify a DVD that has access features.

 

 

Vision Extra and Focal Point

This week’s Guest on Vision Extra is Jade Kelly just returned from her Sites Set on China Trek for Vision Australia.

You can hear Jade’s very descriptive recollections of her trip go to
www.rphadelaide.org.au/links/VE.mp3

This week’s Guests on Focal Point are:
Chris Boyle, Winner of Vision Australia’s Client Services Award, made possible by the Client Representative Committee.

Fred Storbeck, Applications Developer from the Royal Society for the Blind Launching the RSB’s new mobile website.

Paul Rogers, CEO of Fox Creek Wines, talking about his Company’s association and sponsoring of the Blind Sporting Council and the up coming Eye to Eye Banquet.

You can hear these interviews, go to
www.rphadelaide.org.au/links/FP.mp3

I invite you to follow me on Twitter
@sweettweetpeet

Peter Greco 5RPH Radio

Program 320 of New Horizons

PlayPlay

This week on program 320 of New Horizons, Robyn Gaile speaks with Colin Watson, President of the Geelong and Districts Branch of Blind Citizens Australia.

We also hear extracts from the Networking in social Situations session at the Blind Citizens Australia National Convention.

Direct link to listen Program 320

download Program 320

New Horizons is Blind Citizens Australia’s weekly radio program.  It can be heard on RPH and community radio stations throughout Australia.

Broadcast times and stations

New Horizons can also be heard over the Internet from the Blind Citizens Australia website at

http://www.bca.org.au,

on ACB Radio World at

http://www.acbradio.org

and on the Global Voice at

http://theglobalvoice.info.

New Horizons is produced at the studios of Vision Australia Radio in Melbourne.

 

Blind Citizens Australia thanks Vision Australia for their technical Support and for the use of their resources.

You can visit Vision Australia on the web at

http://www.visionaustralia.org

Thanks must also go to Audio-Read for providing the web space for online storage of the older New Horizons files.

Audio-Read are developers of a secure digital multicast system and patented portable Audio Navigator for the delivery and playback of digital audio content.

You can visit Audio-Read on the web at

http://www.audio-read.com.au

Barry Chapman
New Horizons

Braille and Tactile Street Signage

The City of Melbourne has installed 80 new tactile street signs to assist residents and visitors who are blind or have vision impairments to move around the CBD safely.

The City of Melbourne consulted Vision Australia, Vic Roads and Health Science Planning Consultants on the project as part of the Disability Action Plan 2014-2017, to create a more inclusive and accessible city for everyone.

Photo Swanston Street Braille and Tactile street sign in the Melbourne.

Braille and Raised Tactile street signs in Melbourne CBD



Features of the signs include:

high contrast colours to assist people with low vision
braille labels indicating street names
accessible height (plates attached to signposts at eye-level)

The new signs are located at 10 major CBD intersections.

NDS News Update – NDIA revises support definitions and pricing lists

NDIA revises support definitions and pricing lists

The National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) has released new versions of the ‘Support Clusters Definitions and Pricing’. The revised items have positive features, but note: this is not the Agency’s response to the review of the prices for one-to-one supports, which is not expected until the end of November.The positive features include a new category for supporting participants with challenging behaviour or with high medical support needs. This covers support with daily personal activities and support to participate in community, social and civic activities. While the rates set for this support category are inadequate, NDS is pleased that the NDIA has accepted our argument that supporting participants with challenging behaviour or high medical needs costs more than supporting other participants.

NDS is also pleased to see a new support item that recognises that some individuals require higher intensity complex support coordination. The price for this has been set at $83.00 per hour, more than $30 per hour more than the standard coordination price. In addition, the NDIA has acknowledged that where “such support is provided or guided by a health professional because of the needs of the participant, the health professional rates apply for that support.” This range of complex support coordination items better reflects the needs of participants who require assistance with coordination or managing life stages, transitions and supports.

The expansion of the number of items under the ‘Assistance to access and maintain employment’ cluster is also positive. It better reflects the assistance that people with significant disability require to find and maintain employment. The inclusion of ‘Assessment to identify vocational potential and suitability’ and ‘Workplace assessment’ are particularly welcome, along with the items for ‘Post-school employment assistance’.

The prices related to work in an Australian Disability Enterprise have been revised to reflect current ADE case-based funding levels. This at least will clarify pricing arrangements for ADE providers during the launch phase of the NDIS.

As NDS’s negotiations with the NDIA continue, members operating in the launch sites are encouraged to provide NDS with feedback on NDIS prices, particularly those prices relating to accommodation support, group-based community participation and employment. We thank members who have already assisted us with information.

NDS will inform members as soon as the outcome of the review of prices for one-to-one support is available. 

 

Contact Information:
Ken Baker, Chief Executive, Ph 02 6283 3200, ken.baker@nds.org.au